Zeit Contemporary Art

590 Madison Ave, 21st Floor
New York 10022 New York
United States
Email : contact@zeitcontemporaryart.com
URL : www.zeitcontemporaryart.com

Joan Robledo-Palop   (Founder & CEO)

About

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Andy Warhol Flowers (F&S II.71)

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Joan Miró Femme, oiseaux

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Julian Opie Caterina, 2009

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Andy Warhol Daliy News (Gimbel's Anniversary Sale / Artist Could Have Been Choked), 1983

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Andy Warhol Work Boots (Positive)
In the last decade of his life, Andy Warhol returned to the depiction of the everyday, commonplace subject matter that brought him to such fame initially. Based on images such as diagrams, maps, and advertisements culled from newspapers and magazines, in some cases Warhol used a projector to trace the found image before using acetates in a screenprinting process. This technique resulted in a unique mix of manual and mechanical aspects as well as a trompe l’oeil effect. In the case of the Daily News and Valentine’s Hearts Ad, the works respectively actually appear to be what they represent, underscored by their smaller scale.
Warhol became interested in bridging the gap between commercial and fine art through the language of advertising after finding success as a commercial illustrator. After rising to prominence with works such as his seminal Campbell Soup Cans and Brillo Boxes from the early 1960s, Warhol turned to silk-screening to depersonalize and further objectify his works. Well-known for his large-scale depictions of figures such as Marilyn Monroe and Jackie Kennedy, Warhol became obsessed with fame and cultivated his own celebrity persona. In 1968, he was almost fatally shot by radical feminist Valerie Solanas. This experience had a significant impact on the artist, who, already fascinated by mortality, came face-to-face with his own; death became a prominent theme in his work.
Collectively, these late works are especially noteworthy in that they are revelatory of Warhol’s conceptual foundations, which remained constant throughout his career: a fascination with consumer culture, reproduction, and seriality while engaging with politics, economics, and class. Warhol notably created these works of his own accord at a time when the vast majority of his work was commission-based. Many of the images the artist selected, such as the work boots and key copy service, are even humbler than that of a can of soup, while others, such as the Missile maps and newspaper headline about an artist’s near-death experience, can be viewed as a commentary on the anxieties of the Cold War era and Warhol’s own particular preoccupations. This notion is especially persuasive upon noting the visceral red of the Valentine’s Hearts Ad. Viewed in light of the artist’s forthcoming death and the relevance of his work today, these works, some of the last Warhol ever created, are particularly poignant and prescient.

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Andy Warhol Work Boots (Negative)
In the last decade of his life, Andy Warhol returned to the depiction of the everyday, commonplace subject matter that brought him to such fame initially. Based on images such as diagrams, maps, and advertisements culled from newspapers and magazines, in some cases Warhol used a projector to trace the found image before using acetates in a screenprinting process. This technique resulted in a unique mix of manual and mechanical aspects as well as a trompe l’oeil effect. In the case of the Daily News and Valentine’s Hearts Ad, the works respectively actually appear to be what they represent, underscored by their smaller scale.
Warhol became interested in bridging the gap between commercial and fine art through the language of advertising after finding success as a commercial illustrator. After rising to prominence with works such as his seminal Campbell Soup Cans and Brillo Boxes from the early 1960s, Warhol turned to silk-screening to depersonalize and further objectify his works. Well-known for his large-scale depictions of figures such as Marilyn Monroe and Jackie Kennedy, Warhol became obsessed with fame and cultivated his own celebrity persona. In 1968, he was almost fatally shot by radical feminist Valerie Solanas. This experience had a significant impact on the artist, who, already fascinated by mortality, came face-to-face with his own; death became a prominent theme in his work.
Collectively, these late works are especially noteworthy in that they are revelatory of Warhol’s conceptual foundations, which remained constant throughout his career: a fascination with consumer culture, reproduction, and seriality while engaging with politics, economics, and class. Warhol notably created these works of his own accord at a time when the vast majority of his work was commission-based. Many of the images the artist selected, such as the work boots and key copy service, are even humbler than that of a can of soup, while others, such as the Missile maps and newspaper headline about an artist’s near-death experience, can be viewed as a commentary on the anxieties of the Cold War era and Warhol’s own particular preoccupations. This notion is especially persuasive upon noting the visceral red of the Valentine’s Hearts Ad. Viewed in light of the artist’s forthcoming death and the relevance of his work today, these works, some of the last Warhol ever created, are particularly poignant and prescient.

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Paul Gauguin Les Chaumières

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Julio González Les Saules (The Willow Trees)

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Roy Lichtenstein American Indian Theme VI
Other proofs of this woodcut are in the collections of the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, and Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN, USA, among others.

Roy Lichtenstein was one of the most influential Post-war artists of the twentieth century, helping to originate the Pop Art movement. His unique imagery based on comic strips and advertisements bursts with a distinct palette of bold primary colors of reds, yellows and blues.

In the late 1950s Lichtenstein started exploring the root of American Mythology, but it wasn’t until 1970, when he and his wife moved to ​Southampton, NY, residing near a Shinnecock Indian reservation that his “Amerindian” Pop-style works from 1979-1981 emerged. This series combines Lichtenstein’s Cubist abstractions with Native American imagery drawn from American popular iconography.

American Indian Theme VI​ from 1980 is an exceptional piece that combines Lichtenstein’s signature style with Native American motifs and traditional symbols into a stunningly vibrant composition.

Framed dimensions 41.25 x 54.25 in.

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About the Artist

Andy Warhol
Flowers (F&S II.71), 1970
Screenprint in colors on wove paper
36 x 36 in (91.4 x 91.4 cm)
Edition of 250, plus 26 AP

Signed in ball point pen and stamp numbered on the reverse. From the edition of 250, plus 26 AP

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Private collection, United States
Private collection, New York


Joan Miró (1893-1983)
Femme oiseaux, 1976
Oil, gouache, and oil stick on scratched board
25 5/8 x 19 5/8 in (65.1 x 50.2 cm)

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Provenance:
Estate of Joan Miró
Sotheby's, Madrid, 42 works by Joan Miró, December 9, 1986, Lot 4 (in aid of the Fundaciò Pilar i Joan Miró, Palma de Mallorca)
Quitana Fine Arts, New York
Ramis Barquet Gallery, Mexico City
Private collection
Christie's, New York, Impressionist & Modern Works on Paper, November 9, 2000, Lot 460
Waddington Galleries, London
Private collection (acquired from the above in 2004)
Phillips, New York, 20th Century & Contemporary Art Evening Sale, 8 November 2015, lot 14
Private collection, Europe

Literature:
Jacques Dupin, Ariane Lelong, Joan Miró, Catalogue raisonné. Paintings, Volume VI: 1976-1981, ill. n°1737, p.49


Julian Opie
Caterina, 2009
Silkscreen on painted wooden board, this work is unique
32 1/2 x 20 1/4 in (82.6 x 51.3 cm)

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Provenance:
Patrick De Brock Gallery, Knokke
Private collection, Europe
Private collection, New York

Exhibitions:
'Julian Opie. Dancers,' Patrick De Brock Gallery, Knokke, Belgium, 07 August — 01 September, 2009


Andy Warhol
Daliy News (Gimbel's Anniversary Sale / Artist Could Have Been Choked), 1983
Synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen ink on canvas
24 x 16 in (61 x 40.6 cm)

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PROVENANCE:
The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts Inc, New York
Private collection, New York


Andy Warhol
Work Boots (Positive), 1985-86
Synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen ink on canvas
16 x 20 in (40.6 x 50.8 cm)

More info
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The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts Inc, New York
Paul Kasmin Gallery, New York
Private collection, United States


Andy Warhol
Work Boots (Negative), 1985-86
Synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen ink on canvas
16 x 20 in (40.6 x 50.8 cm)

More info
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The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts Inc, New York
Paul Kasmin Gallery, New York
Private collection, United States


Paul Gauguin
Les Chaumières, 1894
Watercolor monotype on thin Japon laid down to board
12 1/8 x 7 5/8 in (30.8 x 19.5 cm)

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Francisco Durrio (according to Field), Paris
Enid Annenberg Haupt, New York
Sold Christie’s New York 01 May 2006, lot 124
Private Collection, New York


Julio González
Les Saules (The Willow Trees), c. 1927
Pen, Indian ink and gouache on paper
2 7/8 x 4 5/8 in (7.4 x 11.7 cm)

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PROVENANCE
Estate of Julio González
Private collection, Barcelona
Private collection, New York

LITERATURE:
Josette Gibert, Julio González. Dessins: Catalogue Raisonné. Paysages. Paris: Editions Carmen Martinez, 1975, illustrated in black and white, p. 66.
Tomàs Llorens Serra, Julio González: catálogo general razonado de las pinturas, esculturas y dibujos, Vol. IV, Madrid: Fundación Azcona; Valencia: IVAM, Institut Valencia d'Art Modern, 2019, cat. no. 2160, illustrated in black and white, p. 57.


Roy Lichtenstein
American Indian Theme VI, 1980
Woodcut on colors on handmade Suzuki paper
37 3/4 x 50 1/4 in (95.9 x 127.6 cm)
Edition of 50, plus 18 AP

More info
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Tyler Graphics, Ltd., Bedford, New York
Private collection, United States